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Calum's Road by Roger Hutchinson

Calum's Road

Roger Hutchinson

This book is a parable: a moving story of stubbornly heroic resistance and of extraordinary personal achievement. It is the story of a statement made from the depths of one man's heart against the unnecessary destruction of his homeland. Calum MacLeod had lived on the northern point of Raasay since his birth in 1911. He tended the Rona lighthouse at the very tip of his island until semi-automation in 1967 reduced his responsibilities. 'So what he decided to do,' says his last neighbour, Donald MacLeod, 'was to build a road out of Arnish in his months off. With a road he hoped new generations of people would return to Arnish and all the north end of Raasay...' And so, at the age of 56, Calum MacLeod, the last man left in northern Raasay, set about single-handedly constructing the 'impossible' road. It would become a romantic, quixotic venture, a kind of sculpture; an obsessive work of art so perfect in every gradient, culvert and supporting wall that its creation occupied almost twenty years of his life. In "Calum's Road", Roger Hutchinson recounts the extraordinary story of this remarkable man's devotion to his visionary project. Calum MacLeod, the last man living in north Raasay builds a road in a desperate bid to maintain a way of life on the island. An inspiring read!

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